New Interdisciplinary Citation Database: Scopus

scopusThe Library now provides access to Scopus — an enormous, interdisciplinary citation database in the sciences, social sciences and some humanities.  What makes Scopus especially powerful is that the articles resulting from a search include links to other works that have cited those articles.   Faculty can search their own publications and quickly see who has cited their work within the Scopus database.  And there are many more features to enhance your research!

The Library is offering two training sessions to introduce you to Scopus: Tuesday, January 7, 10-10:45 OR Wednesday, January 15, 1:30-2:15 in the Electronic Classroom, H-L Library.
Click here for more information and to register.

New York Review of Books Archive Online

Finally, online access to the back issues of The New York Review of Books!!! Just look at the list of reviewers and contributors in the first issue from Feb. 1, 1963: Lowell, Berryman, Dupee, Hardwick, Auden, McCarthy, Rahv, Mailer, Warren, Sontag (I’m not making this up), Kazin, Rich, Hollander, Glazer, Styron, Vidal and even more. And that’s just the first issue. Here’s a gem:
Making a living is nothing; the great difficulty is making a point, making a difference—with words. Elizabeth Hardwick in her piece “Grub Street: New York” from the first issue.

Happy Reading!
Your friends at the Library

New Databases: NAACP Papers and Afro-American Imprints

The Library now has access to two valuable resources for historical research:

ImageThe NAACP Papers: The NAACP’s Major Campaigns–Education, Voting, Housing, Employment, Armed Forces, which includes legal files, correspondence, meeting minutes, news clippings, memoranda, reports, and legal briefs related to these issues.

And Afro-Americana Imprints, 1535-1922, from the Library Company of Philadelphia. This database includes, among much more, congressional addresses, slave narratives, minstrel songs and shows and anti-abolition literature.

Scientific American and National Geographic Archives Now Online

sciamericanThe Bowdoin community now can access the back issues of Scientific American from 1948-1992 and National Geographic from 1888-1994 online. Talk about fun! Read Robert E. Peary’s 1889 address to the National Geographic Society about his adventures in…Nicaragua! (and that other place he’s famous for) or Edward O. Wilson’s 1972 article Animal Communication in Scientific American.

Note that National Geographic does not allow downloading of articles, but you may print. And when you search Scientific American, you will get citations to earlier issues than are available online–you can find those issues at the Hatch Science Library. natgeo

Happy explorations!
Your friends at the Library

New JSTOR Ecology & Botany Collection

botanyWith summer here on campus comes a new journal backfile collection from JSTOR for researching all (well, most)  green (and other colored) living things:  the Ecology and Botany Collection!  From the 1914 issue of the American Journal of Botany to the 1952 issue of Systematic Zoology, there is a nest of back issues for your research needs.

Expanded Science/Social Science Content Available

There’s new content in the following science/social sciences databases (interdisciplinary humanities as well), so you will want to run your regular searches, and new ones, through these old favorites again:

science direct Science Direct– we now have access to almost double the amount of journals– over 2000 of ‘em!


ACM Digital Archive (that would be the Association for Computing ACMMachinery)–we now have access to the complete digital archive, which includes proceedings from both the ACM and the IEEE.


acsACS Complete package (American Chemical Society)– access to all 45 of their journals


SpringerLink–access to almost all of the springerlinkebooks and journals published by Springer, and that’s a lot! We now have a link to the SpringerLink database as a whole so you can search across all content at once.

Entertainment Industry Magazine Archive

EIMAResearch the history of the music, film, theater, tv, and radio industries through the Entertainment Industry Magazine Archive.  EIMA is an archival collection of 20th-century US and UK magazines covering the broad spectrum of the entertainment industry and media including film, television, popular music, radio, and theatre. The magazines are included cover-to-cover, from first issue to the year 2000, and the scope encompasses weekly and monthly mass-market trade and consumer titles.  Note that content is still being added to this database, so some issues are not available as of this posting.