Welcome Class of 2018!

Students at TableWelcome from the Library!  We are here to help you succeed in your study and research, and so each first year student has been assigned a First Year Librarian to help you do just that!  If you missed the message from your First Year Librarian, here’s the list grouped by your last name.  Feel free to contact her or him to introduce yourself if you haven’t already:

Last name begins First Year Librarian
A-Bos Joan Campbell
Bot-Dang Judy Montgomery
Dank-Fre  Karen Jung
Fri-He Carr Ross
Hi-Lem Katie Sasser
Lew-Miller, C  Sue O’Dell
Miller, E-Ph Marjorie Hassen
Pi-Sh Barbara Levergood
Si-Walk  Anne Haas
Wals-Z Carmen Greenlee

We will be offering library tours and office hours in September.  In the meantime, check out the Library’s First Year blog and our Facebook and Twitter pages!

 

Cambridge Histories Online

CambridgeHistorySearch the venerable Cambridge Histories series of books online, anytime.  We bet you’ll be surprised at the range of subjects to which Cambridge Histories have been devoted–here’s a sampling:    Cambridge Economic History of the Greco-Roman World; Cambridge History of the Romance Languages; Cambridge History of Twentieth-Century Music;  Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics; and the Cambridge History of Islam, to name just a few.

New Streaming Dance, Opera, Classical Music Videos

PulchinellaBravo! The Library now has access to several new streaming performing arts databases, all part of our Music Online collection:

Dance in Video, v. 1 includes ballet, jazz, experimental and other genres of dance. Watch Mark Morris’s “stupid men dance.”

Classical Music in Video. Listen to Lorraine Hunt Lieberson sing Rilke.

Opera in Video: Watch/listen toVerdi’s Otello with Placido Domingo and Kiri Te Kanawa.

For the performers out there, we have also added an additional scores module: Classical Scores, v. 2

Writing a Research Paper? Need Help? Ask Us!

Why ask Google when you can Ask Us?  Use our chat, email, or appointment service.  Or contact a librarian who specializes in your area. You can also stop by the reference desks at all of the libraries.  We want to help you get that A!

Wanna do it yourself?  Here’s some help:

Research help page: http://library.bowdoin.edu/help/research-help/index.shtml

Citing sources: http://library.bowdoin.edu/help/citationguides-a-z.shtml

Research Guides by Subject:  http://libguides.bowdoin.edu/

We look forward to working with you in whatever way works best for you!

American National Biography Online

American National Biography
The Library has added another fabulous resource for your research pleasure: American National Biography Online. Search for your favorite (no longer living) Americans. Search Bowdoin College to find our noteworthy alums, professors and friends. Search the Advanced Search by “Realms of Renown” (love it) to find notable Americans in art, government, sciences, religion, society and much more.

 

 

Women’s History Month Resources

The Library has access to many electronic primary and secondary women clip artresources for research on women’s history. Here are some noteworthy sources:

New Interdisciplinary Citation Database: Scopus

scopusThe Library now provides access to Scopus — an enormous, interdisciplinary citation database in the sciences, social sciences and some humanities.  What makes Scopus especially powerful is that the articles resulting from a search include links to other works that have cited those articles.   Faculty can search their own publications and quickly see who has cited their work within the Scopus database.  And there are many more features to enhance your research!

The Library is offering two training sessions to introduce you to Scopus: Tuesday, January 7, 10-10:45 OR Wednesday, January 15, 1:30-2:15 in the Electronic Classroom, H-L Library.
Click here for more information and to register.

New York Review of Books Archive Online

Finally, online access to the back issues of The New York Review of Books!!! Just look at the list of reviewers and contributors in the first issue from Feb. 1, 1963: Lowell, Berryman, Dupee, Hardwick, Auden, McCarthy, Rahv, Mailer, Warren, Sontag (I’m not making this up), Kazin, Rich, Hollander, Glazer, Styron, Vidal and even more. And that’s just the first issue. Here’s a gem:
Making a living is nothing; the great difficulty is making a point, making a difference—with words. Elizabeth Hardwick in her piece “Grub Street: New York” from the first issue.

Happy Reading!
Your friends at the Library

New Databases: NAACP Papers and Afro-American Imprints

The Library now has access to two valuable resources for historical research:

ImageThe NAACP Papers: The NAACP’s Major Campaigns–Education, Voting, Housing, Employment, Armed Forces, which includes legal files, correspondence, meeting minutes, news clippings, memoranda, reports, and legal briefs related to these issues.

And Afro-Americana Imprints, 1535-1922, from the Library Company of Philadelphia. This database includes, among much more, congressional addresses, slave narratives, minstrel songs and shows and anti-abolition literature.

Scientific American and National Geographic Archives Now Online

sciamericanThe Bowdoin community now can access the back issues of Scientific American from 1948-1992 and National Geographic from 1888-1994 online. Talk about fun! Read Robert E. Peary’s 1889 address to the National Geographic Society about his adventures in…Nicaragua! (and that other place he’s famous for) or Edward O. Wilson’s 1972 article Animal Communication in Scientific American.

Note that National Geographic does not allow downloading of articles, but you may print. And when you search Scientific American, you will get citations to earlier issues than are available online–you can find those issues at the Hatch Science Library. natgeo

Happy explorations!
Your friends at the Library