September 23, 1863

Hd qrs. 11th Corps

My dear sister Lizzie,

Otis just came in and said as he had now Officers Gen. Schurg and Col Burchbeck in his tent he feared he would not be able to write you and wished I could do so – said that he was very anxious still about Jamie that he had rec’d nothing later than the telegram and your note in pencil of the same date. Mrs. Stinson’s was of the same date. Says that he is well – I never knew him to have so much anxiety as he has about dear little Jamie and I do trust we will get more cheering news from you soon. [...]

Charles Henry Howard to his sister-in-law, Elizabeth Anne Waite [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

September 20, 1863

Headquarters Eleventh Corps, Catlett’s Station

Dearest,

I received Mrs. Stinson’s letter yesterday and began to realize how sick our poor little Jamie is. In dispatch of the 18th…was two days later. The at present makes me fear he is yet not better, but I cannot yet realize we shall lose him. I say and try to feel as you do, “My will be done.” God has been truly gracious, long-suffering and offers tender kindness to us. Mrs. Stinson says you look pale and worry. I hope you will not over-work but I know you cannot spare yourself, she said mother had com, but did not say whether Gracie had come home. Jamie said in his little room room: “God loves Jamie” and I feel sure, Papa loves Jamie. When he is delirious he does not realize his suffering.

I write very slowly because I keep stopping. It is Sabbath morning about 10 AM. The weather has become very cold. I am left 25 miles in the rear of the rest of the army to grant the communications: this is a nicely how for I can hear from home with more regularity then if I was on the front line. John says I have but ten minutes more. I can think only of home. [...]

Oliver Otis Howard to his wife, Elizabeth Anne Waite [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

September 14, 1863

Headquarters Eleventh Corps

Dearest,

I received your bundle of letters with two most welcome ones from yourself. I had already began one to Grace and intended to send it to Leeds as you said in the letter from July that you would probably have been there for a whole. I sorry to hear that our little Jamie is so small, but are in hopes that you and Dr. Briggs by the divine blessing will soon cure him.

Oliver Otis Howard to his wife, Elizabeth Anne Waite [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

September 8, 1863

Headquarters Eleventh Corps,

Dearest,

I get more and more frightened everyday. I think you must be still visiting and cannot write, I think you must be sick and cannot. I remember that roughly cough and am afraid it is holding on. I did not write you at Farmington for you intended to go to Leeds so shortly I sent my first letter there – one from Washington with a check and two or three since I returned. Day before yesterday I wrote Guy a letter and directed it to Augusta. The days are now quite warm and considerably monstrous. [...]

Oliver Otis Howard to his wife, Elizabeth Anne Waite [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

September 7, 1863

Headquarters Eleventh Corps, Va.

My dear Guy,

Papa begins to wonder why he does not get a letter from Mamma. Is Mamma sick so that she cannot write? Is her cough bad? Are any of the children ill? How is that sweet little baby who talked in his own way and pulled his father’s whiskers? How is Jamie with his keen black eyes and his quiet form? How is sister Gracie, with her loving heart? And how is our manly boy Guy? Did you have a happy time at uncle Rowland’s? And how is papa’s mother, who used to have him, not many years ago as her little boy? Has Grandpa’s finger got well? I want to know all these things and whatever else you can tell me about your visit. [...]

Oliver Otis Howard to his son, Guy [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

September 2, 1863

Headquarters Eleventh Corps, Army of the Potomac.

My dear mother:

The day I wrote you from Washington (last Saturday) at half past seven in the evening we reached Catlett’s Station …I found my horses all looking well after their long rest.  Yesterday Otis reviewed one of the  Brigades and today another.  He has just returned from the Review.  I have been at home as my presence was not required and have been listening to music both from Piano and melodeon by a Capt of General Schurz’s staff.  Monday Otis with manual assistance from me and an occasional help of memory or other suggestion, made out his report of the battle of Gettysburg.  I was writing from early in the morning until late in the evening, but finished it all up in one day, 37 pages on paper like this.  I am writing in my tent which is shared by Capt. Stinson who is now sitting upon my Cot.  Our tent is just in [illeg. word] of the house, north, under the shade of locust trees.  Little Lottie Catlett is just in here, a little girl of 5 or 6, prattling and playing.  She is quite a roguish little piece. …

Charles Henry Howard to his mother, Eliza Otis Howard [Charles Henry Howard Collection]

August 22, 1863

Rikers Island

General,

I have the honor to address you to request a favor for myself if the granting of it is found consistent with your opinion on the subject. My request is if you think my past services and present capability entitle me to hold the rank of Brig. Genl of Vols. that you recommend me for that promotion. [...]

Col. Charles Coster to Oliver Otis Howard [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

 

 

August 17, 1863

Bank of Baltimore

My Dear Sir,

I was one of the few who helped to refresh your first regiment during its passage thro’ our city, since which time I have watching your cause with no small degree of interest – if your cause as a soldier grew beloved which has not failed to challenge my love and admiration you may be sure that your career as a soldier of the Cross has bound me to you and to prosper you in the great work to which in his providence he has called you.

I daily realize the fact that our country needs Christian patriots both in the field and in the cabinet. [...]

A.M. Carter to Oliver Otis Howard [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

July 23, 1863

Headquarters Eleventh Corps, Army of the Potomac, New Baltimore Va.

General -

I am not satisfied with the manner in which my Quarter Master conducts his Department. He was at times displayed great Energy, particularly on the march. His deportment towards me has been unexceptionable. Bu he ignores details to a great extent and from lack of personal supervision troubles are continually arising. For example, yesterday he desired to send out a train for forage to the vicinity of Circleville. I gave permission, but instructed him in no case to send a train without at guard. The guard was ordered and reported, but the train had already gone. Col. Le Duc was away, and no officer, clerk or agent of his department could direct the guard so that it could follow the train, until it was too late. The train of eight or nine wagons was captured, but the wagons were recovered by Col. Le Duc. The mules and teamsters have gone to the enemy. All this arose from neglect on his part to see that the train did not start till the guard had arrived.

I would not injure Col. Le Duc but I do not heel safe, as far as concerns my transportation, with him at the head of the Quarter Master’s Department of this Corps. I therefore ask that he be assigned to duty elsewhere.

I would recommend, in case this application should be granted, that Capt H. B. Lacy be allowed to temporarily perform the duties of Chief Quarter Master of the Corps.

Major General Oliver Otis Howard to Major General George G. Meade [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]