March 8, 1863

West Point

Dear Father,

I will answer your questions as best as I can. As to the shirts, I shall not want them till I get home, I think I can get along tell then. So you need not send them to me hear. 1st.- My checkbook is turned in to the Commissary for settlement, so I don’t know exactly how my account stands. I think I shall be about $50 in debt. I can tell you next letter. 2d. – I cannot get any money to go home with if in debt. 3d. – Our pay goes on while we are on Furlough and amounts to $60, of which $40 we are allowed to have providing we lay it out in clothes, and $16 to go home with if we are out of debt, if we are in debt we can not get the clothes or the money, unless we deposit enough to put us out of debt. 4th. – In case of emergency we could not get one cent paid to us in advance. If we have not the same means to go on Furlough we can’t go at all and will have to stay here all summer. 5th. – Neither goods nor clothes could be sent me without a permit, but you can send all the money you want to., it would be breaking an old rule, but nobody thinks or cares anything about it. The Officers know very well the Cadets get all the money they want from home, they don’t care. I guess the Superintendent likes to have them get all the money they can from home. I shall be happy to receive all you will send. [...]

Malcolm McArthur to his father, Arthur McArthur, Sr. [McArthur Family Papers]

March 1, 1863

3-1West Point

Dear Father,

Your letter of the 22d. was received on the 25th., bringing me the sad news of Aunt Mary’s death. It was not unexpected. You wrote me she was sick in your last letter.

I received a letter from William last evening, I have not had a letter from Charlie since last fall. I have written to him several times. I guess he has forgotten me.

You will find my marks for the week ending Feb. 21st. enclosed.

From your Affectionate Son, Malcolm McArthur

Malcolm McArthur to his father, Arthur McArthur, Sr. [McArthur Family Papers]

February 8, 1863

West Point Feb 8th., ’63

Dear Father,

Sunday has come again and I must finish that letter which you will receive day before this. I have nothing new to write. We are having very warm weather again, it seems very much like Spring and I feel very near to Furlough. Yesterday a tailor came up from New York to see the First Class about making their uniforms and also to see the Furlough Class. A few men got measured for their Furlough clothes. I shall get mine here at the Commissary. I shall hardly have money enough to get home with and there is some doubt about that. I shall be very poor and have only one suit of clothes. I should have got a suit from the New York tailor if I had the money. I guess I can make up some before Furlough. It is only four months. Some of the men begin to count the days. [...]

I should like to get a letter from Mother and Catharine. I want to know the state of affairs in Limington.

Your Affectionate Son, Malcolm McArthur

Malcolm McArthur to Arthur McArthur, Sr. [McArthur Family Papers]

January 25, 1863

West Point Jan. 25th., 1863

Dear Father,

Your short letter of the 18th was received on 22d inst. I suppose William started for Port Royal on the 20th. I have been expecting him here all week. I was very much disappointed at not seeing him.

I am getting along very well with my studies. I think Calculus is the easiest Math we have studied yet.

We are having very warm weather, it looks more like April than January.

How are the Limington soldiers getting along? Were any of them in this last battle?

I have no news to write. Sunday comes round so quick that it seems as though I was writing the same letter all the time. You know how it is. Your letters, I believe are not much longer than mine.

Your Affectionate Son, Malcolm McArthur

P.S. – I don’t suppose you have got a couple dollars you would like to send me?

Malcolm McArthur to Arthur McArthur, Sr. [McArthur Family Papers]