July 3, 1863

Camp 20th Me. near Warrenton Pa.

My dear friends at Home—

Again have I recd a kind letter from home of the date [illeg. paragraph]

We are leaving quite [illeg. word] now, but I expect that we shall move again [illeg. phrase].  It is cloudy today [illeg. passage].  … Corps lost so many horses.  The army had to stop & rest a while [illeg. phrase] up its horses if nothing more & besides the men were getting raggedy everything needed rest, sweet rest.  [illeg. passage]  on the field of battle; I do not know but what you will think it is strange there can be a glimmer of peace[?] amidst such scenes but there nevertheless is; as only after a day of conflict & excitement as we lay ourselves down on the ground, with perhaps a stone for a pillow, & when all is still, & we look up to Heaven & thank our Heavenly Father that our lives have been spared; this then that a feeling of peace steals over us … when we are in camp for a few days … a neighboring Band strikes up in strains of sweet music, first some National Air, then some lively tune, & again some soft melodious strains, ‘tis then that a feeling of peace steals over us … when the Cannon is booming, in the fierceness of battle we can look for peace, for peace can only come to our beni[gh]ted country through these, & these alone. Continue reading

June 17, 1863

Dear Lizzie,

It strikes me we might be a little more sisterly in the way of corresponding and yet I know it takes a good deal of time to write letters and you especially have very little to spare with your little family and your letters to Otis. For my own part, I don’t know but it is as much laziness as anything else that keeps me from writing for I have been intending to send you my love and congratulations ever since the deal little baby came. But you have them now and will you please kiss the little fellow for his Auntie. I  want very much to see him. I wish it wasn’t such a journey between Augusta and Farmington – and such an almost impossible journey with little children. I do wish you could come up and bring all four of them this summer. Is it quite out of the question? I should so love to have you. [...]

Mary Ellen Patten [Ella] to her sister-in-law Elizabeth Ann Waite [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

April 27, 1863

Camp near Falmouth Va.

Dear Brother N.

Again with pleasure do I inform a few moments this evening in writing you and you are probably astonished to see is dated at our old camp – well so am I, for I expected long before this time to be far away… but we seem to be destined to disappointments – perhaps the future will be brighter – hope is will.

This is the second time we have been stopped by rain. This time we had to stop for the mud to dry away and while doing so the enemy found out the plans and so we must wait till new ones are made!… I am not complaining of Providence – no – no!! Only excusing our delay. I am aware that the result is loathing to this army for deeds that will tell when the rebellion – and the south too, are gaining courage from our inactivity.  But I hope the time is not far distant when this army will come forth from a [illegible text] with the heroes of victory in a great and glorious Cause.

[…]

Holman Melcher to brother, Nathaniel Melcher [Holman Melcher Papers]

April 24, 1863

Portland

Dear General,

I take the liberty to write you in behalf of Gentlemen of this city upon a matter which they do not wish to make the object of an official Communication. It is their opinion and they represent the leaders of the Republican Party throughout the state that the Copperheads as they are called confidently expect to carry the state in the fall elections, and that local men of every name must put forth their most earnest efforts to defeat them. It is a most sacred duty not only to the state but our country. To insure success and the defeat of rebellion  here in our midst, it is the desire of Republicans to advance a Union candidate for Governor upon whom the whole loyal heart of the state and the votes of every man who loves liberty, his country, and the right.

I am assumed that the best and most influential men of the Republican party write in naming yourself as the man who in their opinion, can best thus unite the people and heal the state.

Many in this vicinity are anxious to know what are your views upon this subject and if you would accept the nomination. The expression of your feeling and opinion if you see fit to communicate it to me, would not of course be made public, but would be seen only buy a few who have influence and control in political matters and who desire thus to hear from you that they may be able to act understandingly.

I hope you are well and I that God will abundantly strengthen you for your responsible duties and bless you spiritually.

Please give my regards to Charles.

Yours very truly, J.B. Gilman

J.B. Gilman to Oliver Otis Howard [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

April 19, 1863

West Point

Dear Father,

Your letter of 12th was received on 15th inst. I received a letter from William on 16th. which was dated on 2d. inst. He had just returned from Jacksonville and was starting for Charleston. I received a paper from him last evening on which he wrote that he had just returned from to Port Royal all safe.

We have been having quite a stirring time today, Gen. McClellen is here. He was serenaded last night by the Corps. We turned out ten minutes after taps, music by the Cadet Band. Several tunes were played when he came to the door, made a short speech. He is stopping at the Hotel. Today at dinner he came into the Mess Hall, walked round to each table and was introduced to the First Classmen, afterwards he shook hands with the whole Corps as each one went out the door. I don’t know how long he will stay here.

[...] I saw a Maine man here a few days ago, Joel Marshall from Buxton. He went to school at Limington to Mr. Emory. Graduated at Brunswick last summer. He is teaching at Poughkeepsie. He is the first Maine man I have seen since I have been here. [...]

From Your Aff. Son, Malcolm McArthur

Malcolm McArthur to his father, Arthur McArthur [McArthur Family Papers]

April 12, 1863

West Point.

Dear Father,

[...] How do you get along with your business, is money scarce?

I was very glad you had heard from Charlie and that he was teaching. I like that business better than being a salesman.

I have been very anxious all this week to hear from William, we heard Monday that an attack had been made on Charleston but no particulars and did not hear any tell yesterday. The gunboats had made an attack on Fort Sumter. The land forces had not done anything then. This week we shall hear news, good or bad.

William, I know will distinguish himself if he goes in to the Battle, he is a good officer.

Mother has not written me for some time. I shall write as soon as I can get time.

Your Aff. Son, Malcolm McArthur

Malcolm McArthur to his father, Arthur McArthur [McArthur Family Papers]

April 10, 1863

Farmington

Dear Brother Otis

I write you tonight in preference to Frank and Charles to both of whom I believe I owe letters because Guy is here and I know you will wish to hear about him!

He came up last Tues from Bruns. with Ms. Patten. The next day we went to a “sugaring off” at Mr. Titcombs and he had plenty of maple syrup. He went to school one day with Frankie and Otis Sargent and has played with them a good deal. He has worked for me two hours upon different days at 6 cts. per hour piling some dry store novel and shingles. [...] Guy wants to get enough to buy a drum but he put 3 ct. in the contribution of the L.S.

[...] We have seen the order for you to change to the 4th Corps. but are entirely ignorant of that command and hardly know whether to congratulate you or not. All western troops lacking in discipline and cleanliness we fear. As I hear of the gathering of these mighty hosts to battle, I feel we need a real fast. I hope we will have the monthly letter. [...]

Your Aff. Bro., Rowland

Rowland Howard to his brother, Oliver Otis Howard [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

March 26, 1863

Head Quarters at 1st Brigade and Casey’s Div. Chantilly, Virginia

Thursday

Dear Father:

We left camp at Arlington Heights on Tuesday morning at 7 o’clock, were joined by the 27th [?] at a junction of the roads about seven miles out, went on some eight miles further and camped just beyond Fairfax Court House for the night. Wednesday morning at 9 o’clock was a brisk start and marching on some for miles further to Chantilly, our present abiding place. [...]

In haste,
Tom

Thomas H. Hubbard to his father, John Hubbard [Hubbard Family Papers]

March 23, 1863

New York

“To err is human, to forgive is divine!”

Again I must write, Mr. Hubbard, but this time to extend my heart-felt thanks for your kindness in executing my wishes, and those considerate expressions of sympathy. Let me assure you with all possible earnestness that I have implicit confidence in your honor and accordingly the same amount of faith in the language of your last. After our rather uncharitable opinion of, and expressions to each other, this sympathy from you was not expected but that only makes it the more thoroughly appreciated.

Very respectfully yours

Mollie B. Stuart

Mollie B. Stuart to Thomas H. Hubbard [Hubbard Family Papers]

March 22, 1863

3-22West Point

Dear Father,

Your regular Sunday letter was received as usual. I have nothing new to write. I have written quite a long letter to William today so I hope you will excuse this short note this time.

I have forgotten most of my marks for week ending March 14th.

Your Affec. Son
Malcolm McArthur

Malcolm McArthur to his father, Arthur McArthur, Sr. [McArthur Family Papers]