October 30, 1863

Dearest

We have passed through another encounter with the enemy and providentially have escaped unharmed. My Corps left Bridgeport on Tuesday the 27th and marched some fifteen or sixteen miles encamped at a place called Whitinder. You can hardly imagine a rougher country – rocks, hills and mountains with deep valleys. We met with coal miners on the top of the high peaks with an arrangement of a car, tramway and rope to let down the coal. [Illegible name] had a log-house [...] one large woman and several small children. How poor, how filthy, how ignorant the people are. One abandoned house at the Depot was pretty fair. It had two rooms. We had it swept and a fire built. With [illegible] well out and some misgivings about the enemy we had a fair night. [...]

Oliver Otis Howard to his wife, Elizabeth Ann Waite [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

Ocotber 24, 1863

Headquarters Eleventh Corps, Army of the Cumberland, Bridgeport

Dearest,

We received a letter written to Chm. and mailed Oct. 16 – It had reached him in eight days and I am glad to hear Jamie is so well and you say nothing of Guy’s illness so I presume his fever too was soon over. “Ruby has a little cough” to keep company with papa I hope nether will last long. This is a cold damp place, more so than Augusta it seems to me. [...]

Oliver Otis Howard to his wife, Elizabeth Ann Waite [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

October 19, 1863

Bridgeport, Ala.

Dearest,

Yesterday I was lucky enough to get a letter dated the 9th it was nine days on the way. You last said Jamie had begun to recover, but he hadn’t gotten full use of his fist yet. The one didn’t say one word about him and so I must infer that the little fellow is well. I was sorry to find Guy feverish again. How poor his digestion has always been – nuts, acorns and such like he will have to forgo. I suspect he is like his father. My cold holds on unaccountably. I cough pretty hard and raise. The climate is peculiar – fogs on the mountains and along the [illegible] always chilly mornings [...]

Oliver Otis Howard to his wife, Elizabeth Ann Waite [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

September 23, 1863

Hd qrs. 11th Corps

My dear sister Lizzie,

Otis just came in and said as he had now Officers Gen. Schurg and Col Burchbeck in his tent he feared he would not be able to write you and wished I could do so – said that he was very anxious still about Jamie that he had rec’d nothing later than the telegram and your note in pencil of the same date. Mrs. Stinson’s was of the same date. Says that he is well – I never knew him to have so much anxiety as he has about dear little Jamie and I do trust we will get more cheering news from you soon. [...]

Charles Henry Howard to his sister-in-law, Elizabeth Anne Waite [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

September 20, 1863

Headquarters Eleventh Corps, Catlett’s Station

Dearest,

I received Mrs. Stinson’s letter yesterday and began to realize how sick our poor little Jamie is. In dispatch of the 18th…was two days later. The at present makes me fear he is yet not better, but I cannot yet realize we shall lose him. I say and try to feel as you do, “My will be done.” God has been truly gracious, long-suffering and offers tender kindness to us. Mrs. Stinson says you look pale and worry. I hope you will not over-work but I know you cannot spare yourself, she said mother had com, but did not say whether Gracie had come home. Jamie said in his little room room: “God loves Jamie” and I feel sure, Papa loves Jamie. When he is delirious he does not realize his suffering.

I write very slowly because I keep stopping. It is Sabbath morning about 10 AM. The weather has become very cold. I am left 25 miles in the rear of the rest of the army to grant the communications: this is a nicely how for I can hear from home with more regularity then if I was on the front line. John says I have but ten minutes more. I can think only of home. [...]

Oliver Otis Howard to his wife, Elizabeth Anne Waite [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

September 14, 1863

Headquarters Eleventh Corps

Dearest,

I received your bundle of letters with two most welcome ones from yourself. I had already began one to Grace and intended to send it to Leeds as you said in the letter from July that you would probably have been there for a whole. I sorry to hear that our little Jamie is so small, but are in hopes that you and Dr. Briggs by the divine blessing will soon cure him.

Oliver Otis Howard to his wife, Elizabeth Anne Waite [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

September 7, 1863

Headquarters Eleventh Corps, Va.

My dear Guy,

Papa begins to wonder why he does not get a letter from Mamma. Is Mamma sick so that she cannot write? Is her cough bad? Are any of the children ill? How is that sweet little baby who talked in his own way and pulled his father’s whiskers? How is Jamie with his keen black eyes and his quiet form? How is sister Gracie, with her loving heart? And how is our manly boy Guy? Did you have a happy time at uncle Rowland’s? And how is papa’s mother, who used to have him, not many years ago as her little boy? Has Grandpa’s finger got well? I want to know all these things and whatever else you can tell me about your visit. [...]

Oliver Otis Howard to his son, Guy [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

August 22, 1863

Rikers Island

General,

I have the honor to address you to request a favor for myself if the granting of it is found consistent with your opinion on the subject. My request is if you think my past services and present capability entitle me to hold the rank of Brig. Genl of Vols. that you recommend me for that promotion. [...]

Col. Charles Coster to Oliver Otis Howard [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

 

 

August 17, 1863

Bank of Baltimore

My Dear Sir,

I was one of the few who helped to refresh your first regiment during its passage thro’ our city, since which time I have watching your cause with no small degree of interest – if your cause as a soldier grew beloved which has not failed to challenge my love and admiration you may be sure that your career as a soldier of the Cross has bound me to you and to prosper you in the great work to which in his providence he has called you.

I daily realize the fact that our country needs Christian patriots both in the field and in the cabinet. [...]

A.M. Carter to Oliver Otis Howard [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

August 14, 1863

Buttermill Falls

Dear General Howard,

I hasten to copy a letter I received this morning from J. F. Hadley written Saturday – and please answer as soon as possible as I would not send him one word that you had not seen. He need not know that I wrote to you – but I want is well authenticated

“Dear Jeanie

Can’t you furnish me some facts about Gen. Howard which will help me making up a biographical sketch of him. 1st was he a professing Christian when he came to West Point or become one while there. 2nd was he a teacher in the Sabbath school, and what he did in it. – the part he took in meetings etc. 3rd any anecdotes or facts in relation to his religious life at West Point – his companions etc – recall some of the things he has said to you. Now if you will [illegible] your noddle a little and give me a few scraps right away, I shall feel much reliefed.

Yours Truly

Anything about his family – their position occupation etc – Didn’t you tell me he prayed with his regiment the first time he met it. Tell me all the anecdotes you ever heard of him.

J.F. Hadley”

Now I humbly opine that this is the one to do you justice, dear General Howard and as I have had so few opportunities of seeing papers and have never corresponded with anyone near you and am most anxious to see you done justice to, as our much loved friend I write at once, and by your will promptly send me some thing of your life that you would most like to come from the historians’ front.

Ours best and kindest love, Jeannie H. Grey

Jeannie H. Grey to Oliver Otis Howard [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]