June 10, 1863

Headquarters Eleventh Corps, Near Brooke’s Sta., Va

Dearest,

I received a good letter from you in which you compare the unsettled condition of your house to my reputation. I hope you have not worked out that business by yourself. [...]

Oliver Otis Howard to his wife, Elizabeth Ann Waite [Oliver Otis Howard Collection]

June 9, 1863

Headquarters Eleventh Corps, Va.

Dear Sister Lizzie,

Otis has gone out to inspect the camps of one of his Divns and said to me as he was leaving that he had intended to write you this morning and asked me to do so. [...]

Gen. [illegible] has been next up river with a Brigade of Infantry and some Artillery in conjunction with a Cavalry force and this moment I hear very distant firing.

Charles Henry Howard to his sister-in-law, Elizabeth Ann Waite [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

 

 

May 26, 1863

Headquarters Eleventh Corps, near Brooke’s Station.

Dearest: I received a letter from you Sunday afternoon, and felt sorry indeed that seeing your friends had proved so bad for you, but I hope after a little quiet you and yourself again.  I am not so sure that my coming might not excite you even though I belong there.  I do not think I can go home now.  I will tell you my reasons.  My Corps did not do very well at Chancellorsville.  Now everybody who is to blame tries to shift the responsibility upon somebody’s elses shoulders.  The Germans and the Americans are many of them against me.  It was my first trial with them.  Now I must drill & discipline my command & get it in hand.  I must work to get good officers in the command of Brigade and regiments.  I must be here to head off wire-pullers.  I want the command to learn me and I wish to learn it.  Again I rather apprehend an attack here, after the affair at Vicksburg which is so disastrous to the rebels.  They will try some game to retrieve their hopes.  Most probably will accumulate a very large force against Rosencrantz.  In that case we should not be attacked, but perhaps now something desperate will be attempted and Lee will cross above us & attack us hoping to crush this army now that we have lost so many two years & nine month regiments. … I am under a little cloud, tenderly excused but yet unsuccessful, and I have not been accustomed to succumb under difficulties. …

Oliver Otis Howard to his wife, Ann Waite [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

May 23, 1863

Headquarter’s Eleventh Corps. Near Brooke’s Station, Va.

Dearest,

I told you in yesterday’s letter that Miss Lizzie came from Washington with us. Yesterday Charles took her to Falmouth to see Fredericksburg and the troops on the way thither. She thinks she had a fine time notwithstanding the roughness of the roads and of the carriage. Last night we gave her a tea party, inviting all the ladies and a few gentlemen. [...]

Oliver Otis Howard to his wife, Elizabeth Ann Waite [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

May 14, 1863

New York

Maj. Gen. O.O. Howard

Dear Sir,

Your letter of the 10th, in answer to my inquiry after the late Capt. Dessauer, is received, for which you will please accept my thanks. I have already written to Lt. Col. Asmussen in relation to his effects. If you wish to keep his horse you will please send the value of it to my daughter, Mrs. Dessauer [...] or to me.

Very respectfully yours, G.L. Kraft

[Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

April 24, 1863

Portland

Dear General,

I take the liberty to write you in behalf of Gentlemen of this city upon a matter which they do not wish to make the object of an official Communication. It is their opinion and they represent the leaders of the Republican Party throughout the state that the Copperheads as they are called confidently expect to carry the state in the fall elections, and that local men of every name must put forth their most earnest efforts to defeat them. It is a most sacred duty not only to the state but our country. To insure success and the defeat of rebellion  here in our midst, it is the desire of Republicans to advance a Union candidate for Governor upon whom the whole loyal heart of the state and the votes of every man who loves liberty, his country, and the right.

I am assumed that the best and most influential men of the Republican party write in naming yourself as the man who in their opinion, can best thus unite the people and heal the state.

Many in this vicinity are anxious to know what are your views upon this subject and if you would accept the nomination. The expression of your feeling and opinion if you see fit to communicate it to me, would not of course be made public, but would be seen only buy a few who have influence and control in political matters and who desire thus to hear from you that they may be able to act understandingly.

I hope you are well and I that God will abundantly strengthen you for your responsible duties and bless you spiritually.

Please give my regards to Charles.

Yours very truly, J.B. Gilman

J.B. Gilman to Oliver Otis Howard [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

April 22, 1863

Headquarters Eleventh Corps,

My dear little daughter,

Papa thinks it is time for you to have a letter. Guy must have received his and read it before this time. I would like to look in upon you all this morning. I think you must just now be a breakfast. Jamie just at Mamma’s left, bothering her while she is pouring out coffee. Yourself on her right with a bright happy face and Guy directly opposite ready to laugh, or to tell a story. Uncle Rowland says Guy has no time to write him a letter. Guy must be very busy.

Do you still get impatient when you get tired and cry very hard? Or have you gotten older and wiser?

[...] Much love to dearest Mamma, little brothers Guy and Jamie. I hope you all pray for Papa. Your affection papa, O.O.Howard

Oliver Otis Howard to his daughter [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

 

April 10, 1863

Farmington

Dear Brother Otis

I write you tonight in preference to Frank and Charles to both of whom I believe I owe letters because Guy is here and I know you will wish to hear about him!

He came up last Tues from Bruns. with Ms. Patten. The next day we went to a “sugaring off” at Mr. Titcombs and he had plenty of maple syrup. He went to school one day with Frankie and Otis Sargent and has played with them a good deal. He has worked for me two hours upon different days at 6 cts. per hour piling some dry store novel and shingles. [...] Guy wants to get enough to buy a drum but he put 3 ct. in the contribution of the L.S.

[...] We have seen the order for you to change to the 4th Corps. but are entirely ignorant of that command and hardly know whether to congratulate you or not. All western troops lacking in discipline and cleanliness we fear. As I hear of the gathering of these mighty hosts to battle, I feel we need a real fast. I hope we will have the monthly letter. [...]

Your Aff. Bro., Rowland

Rowland Howard to his brother, Oliver Otis Howard [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

April 9, 1863

4-9Dear Guy,

A very poor sketch of the Head Quarters tent. You will see the foundation is of logs but you cannot see the beautiful moss between them;  and you cannot look inside and see very nice stove, table, desk, bed, carpet new chairs and other things. I wish you could look in. We moved here last Tuesday. The privates came before us and fixed my tent very nicely. They are almost all Germans. Mr. Whittelsey has now come to us. Yesterday we all went to a review of a very large number of men. I think some 60,000 or 70,000 men. [… It took a very long time for them to march past the president. There were two little boys, sons of the President, at the river, one of them was but little younger than you and rode a very handsome pony. I think he borrowed the pony. He rode about as well as anybody I saw. I should have liked to have had you there.

[…]

Your affectionate papa,

O.O. Howard

Oliver Otis Howard to his son, Guy [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]

April 3, 1863

Stafford Ctt.

Dearest,

I wrote you a tiny letter yesterday and perhaps will not do much better today. I had not finished the above sentence before I was interrupted and it has been two hours since. I am learning the regiments and officers. This command is completely new to me. I will enclose a list of regiments as I have had them drum up, I imagine you and Jamie can pronounce German names about as well as I.

I am going to move Hd Qrts. to the vicinity of Brooke’s Station tomorrow. [...]

Lovingly, Otis

Oliver Otis Howard to his wife, Elizabeth A. Waite [Oliver Otis Howard Papers]